'The church in town' -- 1937 Lakehurst Road, Buckhorn -- Opposite Lock 31

 

Over ninety people packed the quaint little country church of St Matthew – St Aidan to overflowing on Christmas Eve for the Holy Eucharist. The Communion Service was “for all in town” and many local folks attended in addition to parishioners and people who had travelled from nearby Lakefield and Peterborough.

The music of The Knights-Wevers Ensemble brought a festive touch to the evening. The Ensemble played several anthems to enhance the quiet moments during the Service for pondering the meaning of Christmas. Before the reading of the Gospel, the lights were dimmed and candles lit throughout the congregation while the people joined in singing “Silent Night”.

Shannon Knights and husband, Scott Wevers, are musicians who play with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, The National Ballet Orchestra of Canada, and Tafelmusik. They were joined by Shannon’s parents. Susan and Jonathan Knights, who are also accomplished musicians. We extend our most heartfelt thanks to The Ensemble members for their gracious Christmas gift of music for the parish. And to The Venerable David Peasgood, our sincere thanks and appreciation for his music on the organ.

For those who wished to attend but were unable:

See and follow along in the Order of Service.

Listen to the audio of the Service. Prelude music precedes the Service which begins at minute 17:00. The entire Service is just over 60 minutes. Audio is best for this clip in Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer.

Here also is a link if you wish to cut and paste in the browser:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/2c8q7gwcaw1bhkj/Christmas_Eve_buckhorn_2017.mp3?dl=0


Homily for Christmas Eve 2017

Luke 2: 1-20 NRSV

The Rev’d Glenn Empey


Mary kept these things in her heart. She treasured them and she pondered them. All from the words of a few shepherds. It was what they had been told by angels who appeared to them in their fields in the deep darkness of a silent night. First a single angel and then suddenly a throng and multitude of angels with a message that would change the world. That was a night long ago in a land far away but the mystery remains into this day. There are things to take into your heart and to ponder and treasure on this night.

Now this is a holy mystery and these are holy mysteries. They’re mysteries because they are profound; they reach to the depths of the heart and they well up out of the heart into the world. They’re the spiritual kinds of things such as hope, and peace, and joy, and love. They’re profound but in the end, they’re quite simple. Getting to the simple part is the challenge and what a journey of faith is about, it seems to me.

It’s the kind of hope that outweighs any feeling that all is lost. It’s the kind of hope that sees beyond wishes.

It’s the kind of peace that brings quiet when things are unsettled even in the midst of turmoil. It’s the kind of peace that comes from letting go and being detached from troubles. It’s a peace from realizing what really matters.

It’s the kind of joy that comes from recognizing and owning the reality that, in the world, there is more light than darkness, more good than bad.

And it’s the kind of thing that constantly beckons a person always to be learning more about how to love and to know about being loved without condition. You are never abandoned no matter what.

(Please know that I don’t mean that in any rose-coloured-glasses kind of way. That also has to do with a journey of moving beyond the profound to the simple.)

These are all mysteries – holy mysteries — to hold in your heart, to treasure and to ponder. These are the holy mysteries of what Christmas is all about.

It’s like a process of incarnation of when a tiny baby who is the Messiah comes into the world–not some great king or conqueror, as was prophesied and expected–but a tiny, vulnerable infant child.

All these mysteries are about Jesus’ being born into the world and also into the depths of the heart. And that’s what happens at Christmas. That is what Christmas is all about.

Jesus through these holy mysteries is born once again in the hearts of the children of God. And that happens to be you and me, in our hearts.

Mary had a sense about all this. I think she could see it in the baby’s eyes. Maybe what she’d been told before was beginning to make sense. Maybe the announcement of the angels and the shepherds helped make it clearer for her. Still she pondered what all this meant.

So my prayer this night is that each of you sense and feel once again the story of Jesus’ birth in a way that you can hold it in your heart, to treasure it, to ponder it, and to explore it.

It is a story that has changed the world. And it’s a story that changes you. May there be moments in this night for you to keep these holy mysteries in your heart, to treasure them, and to ponder them. May the stillness, the gift of music and the words of the story itself enable these holy mysteries of Christmas to resonate in your heart.

Some were lost in amazement in that night long ago but Mary treasured all the words she had heard. In this night you can do the same because you also are a child of God in whose heart Jesus is born once again in this night.

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2 thoughts on “Christmas Eve in Buckhorn

  1. I am so happy about the amazing turnout and want to thank you for posting this service as I was stuck in Toronto traffic and missed it! You gave me the gift of the lovely music, the wonderful homily and the description of the atmosphere! Thank you so much and Merry Christmas!

    • Hello Leslie,

      We missed you at the Christmas Eve Service. Glad you got home safely and that you could enjoy Christmas Eve in Buckhorn through the website recording and info. The recording was done from my iPad mini. It doesn’t do justice to the actual sounds that night but it provides a pretty good sample of it all.

      Blessings to you in this Christmas Season,

      Glenn

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